Types of weeping cherry trees are a stunning addition to any yard, with their drooping branches laden with fragrant blossoms in spring and interesting exfoliating bark all year. We’ve got you covered if you’re looking for the best types of weeping cherry trees for your landscape.

Blooms Weeping Cherry Trees PlantAmerica

We’ll explore some superb varieties for front yards, shade, or small spaces, from dwarf weeping cherries to specimens with purple foliage or prolific pink blooms. So if you’re ready to transform part of your yard into an enchanting Japanese garden oasis, let’s find the perfect weeping cherry tree to shower your corner of the world with floral delights for decades to come.

Weeping Cherry Trees For The Perfect Drooping Garden

1. Kwanzan Cherry

Kwanzan Cherry Blooms PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Oval, Deeply serrated
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry leaf spot, Aphids

The showy pink Kwanzan cherry is one of the most popular weeping cherry trees for its profuse blooms and exfoliating bark. Kwanzan cherries (Prunus serrulata ‘Kwanzan’) reach 20 to 25 feet tall with a distinctive weeping habit. The Kwanzan cherry is a petite yet picturesque small tree that provides beauty and grace to small landscapes throughout the year.

In early spring, before a hint of green appears, the bare branches are smothered in clusters of delicate two-inch pink blossoms. As temperatures rise and buds swell, a cloud of pale pink envelopes the tree in a floral embrace, perfuming the air with a sweet scent. These frilly pom-poms signal the end of winter’s dormancy and herald warmer days to come.

As spring’s bloom fades, oval leaves with serrated edges emerge and harden, turning the tree into a verdant gateway of green. The leaves shine with a rich, glossy hue throughout summer, framed by the branches that take on an upward arch before beginning to weep toward the ground.

Come autumn, the foliage paints the perfect scene in shades of gold, orange, and russet red. The radiant colors intensify as temperatures drop, engulfing the weeping limbs in a kaleidoscopic glow before the leaves drift to the ground in swirls of color.

As the cherry matures, the gnarled bark adds character and dimension. The trunk and main branches develop deep ridges and furrows. Their exterior layers flake away to expose contrasting shades of brown and orange underside tissues. The overall effect evokes the wise visage of an ancient storyteller.

With selective pruning and care, Kwanzans can grace small landscapes for decades. Their diminutive stature is perfect for restricted areas yet their overflowing pink blooms in spring, glowing foliage in fall, and gracefully weeping form embellished with weathered bark impart grandeur beyond their size. The Kwanzan cherry may grow small, but its sublime gifts of beauty, grace, and peaceful symmetry elevate any garden where its poetic branches wave.

2. Sargent Cherry

Sargent Cherry Tree Branch PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Oblong, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist soil
  • Common Pests: Caterpillars, Maple borer beetle

The Sargent cherry tree begins its long life as a stately upright specimen but matures into a beautifully branching weeping form over time, making it a versatile accent for any size garden. Young Sargent cherry trees shoot skyward, reaching 40 to 50 feet tall and 25 to 30 feet wide in only two decades. 

Their oblong leaves emerge from red-tipped buds in spring and turn buttery yellow, burnt orange, and scarlet red in fall. Overlapping white flowers blanket the spreading branches in early spring before the leaves appear, signaling the end of winter’s dormancy.

As the cherry ages, its habit slowly transforms. Once upright and dense, the branches begin to arch downward under the weight of foliage and bloom. Over decades, the canopy takes on an elegant weeping form, the boughs stretching gracefully toward the ground in lengthening curves.

The bark also develops character with maturity. Younger specimens have smooth gray bark that develops shallow furrows and flaky ridges as the tree ages. The exposed inner tissue creates patterns of contrasting orange-brown hues against the fading gray exterior, adding visual appeal throughout winter.

Pruning is vital to maintain the tree’s health and mitigate pest damage as it transforms. Selective pruning during dormancy promotes air circulation to reduce fungal leaf spot issues. Pruning also encourages new branch growth that develops a fuller weeping habit over time. With careful pruning and care, Sargent cherries can live and evolve for over a century. 

3. Japanese Weeping Cherry

Japanese Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Deciduous
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic to ovate, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry fruit fly, Japanese beetle

With its graceful cascading branches laden with fragrant pink or white flowers in spring, the Japanese weeping cherry creates a picturesque focal point in the landscape. The Japanese weeping cherry is a poetic vision of timeless beauty, recounting the passing of each season through graceful bowed branches heavy with blooms, fronds, and fruit.

In early spring, clusters of fragrant pink or white flowers burst forth to announce the end of winter’s slumber. As temperatures rise, the delicate bundled blooms release a sweet perfume to fill surrounding spaces with hope and renewal.

As springtime fades, elliptic to ovate leaves unfurl and harden to provide a leafy canopy that dances in the summer breezes. The broad dark green fronds catch the sunlight, highlighting the serpentine branching habit that becomes more pronounced as the branches weep closer to the ground with age.

In autumn, the leaves alter their shade as days shorten, changing from green to gold, orange, and finally deep burgundy before dropping to expose the attractive peeling bark seen only in winter. The mottled cream, pink and gray hues stand in stark relief against bare branches and open sky.

Over decades, selective pruning encourages the weeping cherry’s sculptural form, producing lengthening bowed branches that drip from the vase-shaped canopy like raindrops suspended by surface tension. The entire tree becomes a graceful question mark resting upon the landscape.

With minimal care, Japanese weeping cherry trees can flourish for over a century, unfolding their gifts year after year. Fragrant blooms herald the resolute return of spring, a leafy canopy provides cooling shade through the heat of summer, and fiery autumnal foliage bathes the garden in living flame before revealing intricately patterned bark through winter’s long night of stillness.

4. Purple Cascade Weeping Cherry

Purple Cascade Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Rich soil
  • Common Pests: Aphids, Japanese beetle

The purple cascade weeping cherry tree features arching branches heavy with soft pink flowers in spring and aromatic purple-red leaves all season. Purple cascade cherry (Prunus ‘Amanogawa’) grows 20 to 30 feet tall with a graceful rounded canopy shaped by weeping branches.

The tree blooms profusely in early spring with bell-shaped pink flowers. After blooming, the leaves emerge. The elliptic leaves are serrated and a rich purple-red color all season, turning a burgundy-purple in fall. The weeping habit intensifies as the tree matures.

Aphids feed on the undersides of new leaves, causing distortion and sticking. Apply dormant oil spray in late winter before buds swell to control overwintering aphids. Apply horticultural oil sprays during active growth stages if needed.

Overall, purple cascade cherries make a statement specimen tree for small yards due to their exquisite purple weeping branches heavy with blossoms in spring, and aromatic purple foliage all season. Once established, they require minimal upkeep while acting as a beacon of serenity and beauty year-round.

5. Pink Snow Showers

Beauty Pink Snow Showers PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Oblong to ovate, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry leaf spot, Cherry fruit worm

The Pink Snow Showers ornamental cherry tree is a petite yet stunning spring bloomer. As a dwarf weeping cherry cultivar, it has a graceful cascading habit perfect for small gardens and containers.

Naturally restricted to a tidy six-eight foot height and spread, Pink Snow Showers has arching, pendant branches that cascade towards the ground. This mounding form elegantly trains against walls, fences or architectures in tight spaces normally unsuitable for trees.

In very early spring before its leaves, the tree erupts in a profuse display of pure pink, semi-double flowers. Each blooming cluster is approximately 1-1.5 inches wide, resembling puffs of cotton candy or pink snow drifts from afar thanks to their dense abundance.

Once blooms fade, small, dark green leaves with serrated edges emerge on the branches. In autumn, they showcase vibrant shades of yellow, orange and red before dropping to reveal stately gray bark through winter.

Thriving in USDA zones five to nine, Pink Snow Showers is remarkably low maintenance. It prefers well-drained soil and full sun but is adaptable. Shaping pruning may be done only for sustaining its graceful form. 

6. Pendula Cherry

Pendula Cherry Blooming PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic to ovate, Toothed edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry fruit fly, Cherry fruit worm

Pendula cherry is prized for its graceful weeping branches, profuse white flowers in spring, and attractive foliage that changes color in fall. Pendula cherry (Prunus cerasifera ‘Pendula’) grows 25 to 30 feet tall with gracefully arching branches that weep toward the ground.

The shiny white flowers emerge before the leaves in spring and cover the bare branches. Elliptic to ovate leaves with toothed edges follow and turn yellow, orange, and red in fall. The tree’s distinctive weeping habit intensifies as it ages. Cherry fruit fly maggots feed inside ripening cherries, leaving rotting fruit clinging to branches. Bag immature fruit to exclude flies.

Overall, the pendula cherry makes an excellent choice for medium-sized yards due to its distinctive pendulous branches heavy with fragrant white blossoms in spring followed by colorful fall foliage.

7. Tai Haku Cherry

Tai Haku Cherry White PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Caterpillars, Cherry leafhopper

Named for its pale bark and white flowers, the Tai Haku cherry is a weeping cherry tree prized for its beauty, fragrance, and delicacy. Tai Haku cherry (Prunus ‘Tai Haku’) grows 20 to 30 feet tall with gracefully arching branches that weep towards the ground.

In spring before the leaves emerge, the branches are covered with profuse clusters of fragrant white flowers. Elliptic leaves with serrated edges follow and turn yellow, orange, and red in the fall. The weeping habit intensifies as the tree matures, revealing its exfoliating chalky white bark. Caterpillars feed on leaves, causing defoliation.  Hand-pick larvae and destroy them.

8. Yoshino Hybrid Weeping Cherry

Yoshino Hybrid Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Ovate, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Japanese beetle, Cherry slugs

The Yoshino Hybrid Weeping Cherry is a graceful, delicate ornamental tree prized for its cascades of pure white blooms in early spring. A cultivar of the Yoshino cherry, it features a gracefully arching habit with dangling branches that can trail close to the ground.

Native to Japan and Korea, this centuries-old cultivar thrives in U.S. growing zones five-nine where winters are cold. It prefers well-drained, slightly acidic soil and full sun exposure. As a small deciduous tree, it reaches heights of 15-20 feet with a similar spread when mature. 

In mid-spring before its leaves emerge, the tree is blanketed in thousands of soft white, double-floret blooms. Each flower appears as a frilly cluster up to 1.5 inches wide. Their profuse blooming creates a lush, cloudlike effect that resembles wispy snow showers from afar.

After flowers fade, oval green leaves with serrated edges emerge and shine dark green all summer. Vibrant autumn foliage ranges from yellow to burnt orange to deep red depending on growing conditions. Smooth gray bark adds winter interest when leaves drop.

Beyond superb ornamental beauty, this Japanese import thrives in smaller gardens and landscapes. Its naturally cascading form readily trains to fences, walls, patios or narrow spaces where a traditional canopy tree won’t fit. Roots remain surface-level and non-invasive.

Low care requirements of minimal pruning and no irrigation except in drought cement the Yoshino Hybrid’s popularity worldwide.

9. Snow Fountain Weeping Cherry

Snow Fountain Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Ovate to oblong, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry leaf spot, Cherry slugs

The snow fountain weeping cherry tree features arching branches heavy with clusters of single white flowers in spring and ovate to oblong leaves that turn brilliant hues in fall. Snow fountain cherry (Prunus ‘Snow Fountain’) grows 20 to 25 feet tall with gracefully arching branches that weep toward the ground.

Before the leaves emerge in spring, clusters of single fragrant white flowers cover the bare branches. Ovate to oblong leaves with serrated edges follow and turn yellow, orange, and red in fall. Cherry leaf spots can cause damage during rainy spring periods. Prune selectively during dormancy to promote air circulation. Apply preventative fungicide sprays at bud break and after flowering.

Overall, snow fountain cherries make an excellent choice for small yards due to their manageable size and clusters of beautiful single white blooms in spring followed by colorful foliage in fall. Once established, they require minimal upkeep while adding year-round architectural interest and delighting the senses.

10. Pink Cascade Weeping Cherry

Pink Cascade Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry fruit fly, Brown rot

The pink cascade weeping cherry tree features arching branches heavy with fragrant clusters of vibrant pink flowers in spring and elliptic leaves that turn shades of gold, orange and red in fall. Pink cascade cherry (Prunus ‘Pink Cascade’) grows 20 to 25 feet tall with gracefully arching branches that weep toward the ground.

In early spring before the leaves emerge, profuse clusters of vibrant hot pink flowers cover the bare branches. Elliptic leaves with serrated edges follow and turn gold, orange and red in fall. Cherry fruit fly maggots feed inside ripening cherries, leaving rotting fruit clinging to branches. Bag immature fruit to exclude flies before they lay eggs.

11. Yoshino Weeping Cherry

Yoshino Weeping Cherry Tree PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Japanese beetle, Black cherry

The Yoshino weeping cherry features showy clusters of double pink flowers in early spring and gracefully arching branches laden with elliptic leaves that turn yellow, orange and red in fall. The Yoshino weeping cherry (Prunus x yedoensis ‘Pendula’) grows 20 to 30 feet tall with gracefully arching branches that weep toward the ground.

The Yoshino weeping cherry offers a captivating display of beauty that captivates the senses throughout the year. In early spring, clusters of double pink flowers cloak the bare branches in a pale to deep blush hue. The overlapping petals create full pom-pom shapes that sway gently in the breeze, releasing a sweet fragrance.

The profusion of blossoms signals the end of winter and the arrival of warmer days to come. As spring progresses, elliptic leaves with serrated edges emerge and harden. They remain a lush dark green through summer, adding visual interest to the gracefully arching branches.

The weeping form becomes more pronounced as the weight of the foliage bends the branches downward, creating a cascading silhouette. In fall, the leaves reveal their true splendor and transform into a kaleidoscope of color. Shades of gold, amber, orange, and crimson emerge and intensify as temperatures drop.

The entire tree becomes aglow, bathing the landscape in brilliance before the leaves drop to the ground. Throughout the seasons, the distinctive gnarled branching pattern adds sculptural charm. Younger specimens have arching but upright branches while older trees develop long serpentine limbs that weep close to the ground, creating an elegant vase shape.

The texture of the bark also enhances the tree’s year-round appeal. Smooth gray bark on younger stems develops rough vertical ridges and horizontal plates as the tree ages. Outer layers flake away to reveal patterns of contrasting brown and orange hues against the lighter bark.

With regular pruning and care, the Yoshino cherry can thrive for decades, unfolding its gifts at each change of season.

12. Cheals Weeping Cherry

Cheals Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Elliptic to ovate, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Japanese beetle, Aphids

The Cheals weeping cherry features graceful arching branches heavy with clusters of hot pink double flowers in spring and dark green elliptic to ovate leaves all season. Cheals weeping cherry(Prunus ‘Cheal’s Weeping’) grows 20 to 25 feet tall with gracefully arching branches that weep toward the ground.

The Cheals weeping cherry is a wonderful choice for smaller gardens, offering eye-catching spring blooms, elegant weeping form, and year-round interest. In early spring, before the leaves emerge, clouds of double hot pink flowers burst forth along the graceful arching branches.

The overlapping rounded petals create dense pom pom-like clusters of color against the bare wood. The deep fuchsia hue against a backdrop of gray branches makes for a striking springtime display.

As the blooms fade, dark green elliptic ovate leaves unfold to reveal their finely toothed edges. They remain a handsome glossy dark green hue throughout the growing season, adding richness and depth to the weeping form. The leaves catch the breeze and move in an ethereal dance, highlighting the serpentine branches.

As the Cheals cherry matures, its weeping form becomes more pronounced. The gracefully arching branches lengthen, bow, and twist in an intricate cascade toward the ground. Every year the weeping habit intensifies, making for an elegant sculptural accent in the garden.

Even in winter, the distinctive bark adds visual interest. Younger specimens have a smooth gray exterior but as they age, vertical ridges and cracks develop. The exposed inner layers begin to exfoliate in irregular patterns of pale orange and brown, creating an intricate texture and mottled effect.

13. Dwarf Weeping Cherry

Pink Dwarf Weeping Cherry PlantAmerica

🌱 Key Points
  • Growing Season: Spring flowering
  • Leaf Shape: Ovate, Serrated edges
  • Specific Needs: Full sun, Consistently moist, Well-draining soil
  • Common Pests: Cherry leaf spot, Cherry fruit fly

The Dwarf Weeping Cherry is a compact, graceful ornamental tree prized for its gracefully arching habit and stunning spring blooms. It thrives in average garden conditions and small landscapes where space is limited. 

As a dwarf cultivar of the yoshino cherry, it reaches heights of only six-10 feet with a similar spread. Its slender, pendant branches weep towards the ground in a beautifully tiered form. This mounding shape makes it ideal for lining walkways, patios, or fitting into tight corners. 

In early spring before its leaves emerge, the tree bursts into a cloud of soft pink, fragrant double-bloom flowers. Each frilly bloom cluster reaches 1-twoinches wide. Their abundance creates a candy floss-like visual effect, resembling wisps of pink smoke from afar.

Once blooms fade, small, oval green leaves with serrated edges emerge. Brilliant shades of red, orange and burgundy dominate during fall. Its smooth gray bark adds winter interest. Thriving in U.S. growing zones four-eight, the Dwarf Weeping Cherry adapts well to average soil and full sun or partial shade. Drought tolerant once established, it requires minimal care—pruning only for shaping or to remove dead wood. 

Compared to standard cherry trees, its miniature scale suits smaller residential plots perfectly. Cascades of blooms suspended overhead evoke a sense of romance. Later, fiery fall foliage and sculptural winter form maintain visual interest through seasons.

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