Purple succulents add color and a unique look to any garden. Whether you have a desert-inspired cactus garden or a traditional flower bed, purple succulents can bring an eye-catching splash of vibrancy.16 Purple Succulents Plant America

From echeverias and aeoniums to kalanchoes and sempervivums, we’ll cover some of the best purple-hued plants that thrive in minimal water and care. So if you want to breathe new life into your landscape or add a modern artistic twist, keep reading to discover some amazingly beautiful purple flowering succulents you can incorporate into your garden this year!

Prettiest Purple Flowering Succulents for Your Garden

1. Sempervivum ‘Heuffelii’Growing Sempervivum Heuffelii Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Thick leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Good Drainage
  • Common pest: Slugs, Aphids

Sempervivum ‘Heuffelii’ forms rosettes of dark purple leaves (purple succulent plants) that develop pink flowers in summer. The thick leaf texture makes this plant drought-tolerant and easy to care for.

Sempervivum ‘Heuffelii’ produces tight, rounded clusters of overlapping leaves that range from four to eight inches across. The leaves are a beautiful burgundy hue with dark green tips. In summer, 8 to 12 pink flowers emerge on thin, wiry stems up to 12 inches tall.

This succulent thrives in full sunlight and requires minimal watering. Water only when the soil is dry, allowing it to dry out between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is preferred over more frequent, shallow watering.

Sempervivum prefers well-drained soil that is slightly alkaline. Mix coarse sand or perlite into potting soil to improve drainage for container plants. Fertilize sempervivum succulents once in spring and again in summer using a diluted, balanced fertilizer specifically for cacti and succulents.

Propagate new plants from sempervivum leaf cuttings. Simply pull off a healthy leaf and set the torn end on damp soil. New plantlets will form at the base of the removed leaf and develop roots for transplanting.

The rosettes of Sempervivum ‘Heuffelii’ make an attractive, low-maintenance addition to rock gardens and stone walls. The dark purple foliage creates contrast when paired with greenery or lighter colored succulents. The purple hen and chicks variety tolerates neglect well but appreciates infrequent watering to keep the leaves plump and colors vibrant.

2. Aeonium ‘Purple Pearl’Growing Season for Aeonium Purple Pearl Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Fleshy leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Rodents, Fungus gnats

Aeonium ‘Purple Pearl’ features beautiful deep purple rosettes of fleshy leaves with sharp tips. This succulent houseplant produces bright pink flowers in summer. Place aeonium ‘purple pearl’  in bright, indirect light to discourage leaf discoloration and flower bud drop. Filtered or dappled light is ideal. Rotate the pot periodically to ensure even exposure.

Water weekly when the soil surface is dry. check the top one inch of soil and water thoroughly when it is slightly dusty or begins to pull away from the pot. Allow the top inch of ‘purple pearl’ soil to dry out between waterings. In summer, water more frequently to accommodate increased growth and flowering. Fertilize monthly or every six weeks with a diluted, balanced fertilizer formulated for succulents.

The rosettes of aeonium ‘purple pearl’ can grow up to eight inches wide. The thick, fleshy leaves are dark maroon to almost black with purple undersides and terminate in rigid, spiny tips. In spring and summer, clusters of bright pink urn-shaped flowers appear on long stalks above the foliage.

Snip off any flowers as they fade to encourage the plant to put energy into leaf growth instead. Remove any yellow or brown lower leaves as they die back. Propagate new plants by dividing large rosettes in spring or rooting stem cuttings in moist soil.

The striking dark foliage and bright pink flowers of aeonium ‘purple pearl’ make it a striking succulent houseplant option. Infrequent care requirements and impressive colors lend this aeonium variety well to becoming a modern, low-maintenance indoor decor.

3. Echeveria ‘Black Prince’Leaf Size of Echeveria Black Prince Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Dark, burgundy leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Fungus gnats, Aphids

Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ forms miniature rosettes with dark burgundy leaves that resemble burned or scorched ground covers. The leaves develop a dusty coating that helps reduce moisture loss. Echeveria ‘Black Prince’ rosettes grow only two to four inches in diameter. The paddle-shaped leaves are a striking blackish-purple with a powdery, white farina coating. The foliage has stiff, teeth-like tips along the margins.

Water this succulent sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out fully between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is preferred over more frequent, shallow watering. Avoid overwatering, which can cause leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

Grow echeveria ‘black prince’ in full sunshine for the darkest leaf coloration and minimum leaf loss. Filtered light can also work, but may cause leaves to lose their vibrant hue. Place plants where they can receive 6 or more hours of direct light per day.

Check the foliage regularly for signs of excess moisture. Wrinkled, deflated leaves indicate overwatering. Remove any fallen or damaged leaves at the base to discourage rot. Damaged leaves heal quickly due to the inherent drought tolerance of this succulent.

Echeveria ‘black prince’ makes a striking accent plant on its own due to the unique color scheme and miniature rosette form. The dark burgundy foliage also offers nice contrast when paired with lighter-colored succulents or used as a foreground planting. Minimal care requirements and a low tolerance for overwatering make this an attractive option for beginning succulent gardeners.

4. Echeveria ‘Purple Heart’Specific Needs of Echeveria Purple Heart Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Compact, purple centered leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

In spring and summer, this plant develops bright pink tubular flowers. The rosettes of echeveria ‘purple heart’ typically grow four to six inches in diameter. The fleshy leaves are widest at the base, tapering to a hard, pointed tip. The outer edges of the plant’s leaves are deep pink to violet in color, contrasting nicely with the purple center.

Water this succulent sparingly, allowing the soil to dry out fully between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is preferred over more frequent, shallow watering. Avoid overwatering, which can cause leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

Avoid cold drafts and excess humidity that can lead to rot issues. Allow the ‘purple heart’ soil to dry out completely between waterings and provide adequate airflow and ventilation. Monitor foliage color for signs of stress and increase light exposure as needed.

The contrasting purple and magenta coloration of echeveria ‘purple heart’ makes this an attractive succulent option. The compact form and minimal care it needs suit it well for container growing. Provide bright, filtered light and infrequent watering to optimize foliage color and flower production.

5. Sedum’s ‘Purple Beauty’Common Pests in Sedum s Purple Beauty Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Spreading leaves, Reddish purple color
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Sedum ‘Purple Beauty’ has fleshy stems with reddish-purple leaves that form a spreading mat. In summer, it produces tiny starry pink flowers. This drought-tolerant succulent is easy to grow and requires minimal watering.

The leaves of sedum ‘purple beauty’ are fleshy, oval shaped and pointy ended, ranging from dark purple to reddish purple in color. The stems and foliage form a low-growing mat that spreads outward, typically reaching six to eight inches tall and up to two feet wide.

In warmer weather, sedum ‘purple beauty’ produces clusters of star-shaped pink flowers that rise slightly above the foliage on thin stems. The flowers typically appear from mid-summer through early fall.

Water this sedum only when the top one inch of soil is completely dry. Allow the ‘purple beauty’ soil to dry out completely between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is preferred over more frequent, shallow watering. Place sedum ‘purple beauty’ in full sun for the darkest leaf color and maximum flowering. It can tolerate some shade but may lose some of its vibrant purple hue under low light conditions.

6. Agave ‘Santa Rita’Growing Agave Santa Rita Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Spiked
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Agave ‘Santa Rita’ features fleshy blue-green leaves with reddish-purple tips and spines. As it ages, the entire leaf turns a rosy hue. The thick, stiff leaves of agave ‘Santa Rita’ radiate outward from a central crown. Mature plants form a rosette around two to three feet in diameter.

Young leaves emerge blue-green in color before developing reddish tones, spines, and teeth along the margins. As the leaves age and harden off, the entire surface may turn a rich rose hue.

This agave needs extremely well-drained soil to thrive. Amend the planting area with quantities of coarse sand or gravel to improve drainage. Only water when the soil is completely dry. During winter dormancy, withhold water completely.

The rosy leaf color, succulent texture, and easy-care nature of agave ‘Santa Rita’ make it an attractive choice for arid landscapes. Use as a bold accent plant to provide visual punch and textural contrast. The rugged, architectural form also suits it well for decorative pots and containers.

7. Senecio MandraliscaeSpecific Needs of Senecio Mandraliscae Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Bright purple leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Senecio mandraliscae starts with bright purple leaves that fade to lime green with age. New leaves emerge deep purple throughout the growing season, giving the plant a two-toned appearance. This easy-to-grow succulent tolerates drought well and requires minimal care. Water only when the top inch of soil is dry. Allow the Senecio soil to dry out fully between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is preferred.

Place Senecio mandraliscae in bright, indirect light for optimal foliage color without leaf burn. Partial or dappled sunlight works well. Rotate the plant occasionally to ensure even exposure. Avoid hot, direct sunlight, which can cause leaf discoloration.

The low-maintenance nature and unusual coloration of Senecio mandraliscae make it an interesting succulent option. Infrequent care requirements and long-lived leaves suit this plant well for low-impact container displays and houseplant settings. Snip off any whole leaves or stems as needed to maintain a tidy appearance.

8. Echeveria’s ‘Dark Purple’Indoor Echeveria s Dark Purple Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Plum colored leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Sandy soil
  • Common pest: Aphids, Scale insects

Echeveria ‘Dark Purple’ forms compact rosettes with plum-colored leaves with a waxy coating. The young rosettes are nearly black. The thick leaves of echeveria ‘dark purple’ are dark maroon to almost black in color when young, though they fade slightly to a deep reddish-purple hue as the rosette matures. The leaves are paddle-shaped and smooth edged with a waxy coating that helps stop moisture loss.

Water this succulent sparingly, especially during its winter dormancy. Allow the Echeveria soil to dry out fully between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is preferred over frequent, shallow watering. Avoid overwatering, which can cause leaves to become limp, yellow, and drop off.

Place Echeveria ‘dark purple ‘in bright, indirect light for optimal color and minimal leaf loss. It can tolerate some direct sun if gradually acclimated, but extreme light can scorch the tender foliage. Avoid dark, humid conditions, which can promote fungal or mold growth.

9. Echeveria ‘Purple Haze’Echeveria Purple Haze Succulent Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Blue green leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Scale insects

Echeveria ‘Purple Haze’ features rosettes of blue-green leaves with purple tips and edges. As the rosette ages, the leaves darken to a deeper purple hue. The thick, wavy leaves of echeveria ‘purple haze’ are wedge-shaped with pointed tips. Young leaves emerge blue-green in color with purple edges and tips that gradually spread, covering the entire surface as the rosette matures.

Over time, the purple coloration darkens, resulting in nearly black leaves in older rosettes.This succulent requires minimal watering. Water only when the top inch of soil is dry and allow the entire root ball to dry out between waterings. Infrequent, deep watering that thoroughly soaks the soil is preferred. Avoid overwatering, which can cause leaf drop.

When flowers fade, trim them off at the base to encourage branching. Place plants in bright, indirect light for deep color development and minimal leaf loss. While Echeveria can tolerate some direct sun if gradually acclimated, extreme light can scorch the thick foliage. Partial shade to dappled sunlight works best.

10. Sedum ‘Rita Prickly’Growing Sedum Rita Prickly Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Clumping leaves, Reddish purple color
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Sedum ‘Rita Prickly’ forms dense clusters of reddish-purple leaves on spreading stems. The stems can touch the ground and root to form new plants. The thick, fleshy leaves of Sedum ‘Rita prickly’ are wedge-shaped and taper to sharply pointed tips. The leaves range in color from deep purple to almost black with a reddish tint. As the stems spread outward, they form cascading mats of foliage.

Though the foliage color is beautiful, the sharply pointed leaves are prickly and require caution when handling the plant. Wear gardening gloves to protect hands, especially if deadheading flowers or dividing and replanting stems. Water Sedum ‘Rita prickly’ infrequently, allowing the top one to two inches of soil to dry out between waterings.

This beautiful plant thrives in hot, dry conditions and good drainage is key. Fertilize only once or twice per year in early spring and again in summer. Place Sedum ‘Rita prickly’ in full sun for maximum foliage color and flowering performance. In summer, small clusters of pale pink flowers appear at the stem ends. Allow the flowers to fade naturally before removing them to prevent damaging new growth.

11. Sedum ‘Lilac Mound’Best Season for Sedum Lilac Mound Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Spreading leaves, Lilac purple leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Sandy soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Sedum ‘Lilac Mound’ makes a compact mat of lilac-purple leaves with reddish tips. New growth emerges bright pink before maturing to purple. The plant requires minimal water and thrives in hot, dry conditions with good drainage. The fleshy, succulent leaves of Sedum ‘Lilac Mound’ are oval to triangular in shape and clustered densely along creeping stems.

The mature leaves range from lilac to deep purple in color with reddish tips. New growth initially has a bright pink tint before darkening as it matures. Water Sedum ‘Lilac Mound’ infrequently, allowing the top one to two inches of soil to dry out between waterings. This plant is well-adapted to hot, dry conditions, so good drainage is essential. Waterlogging can cause root rot.

Place Sedum ‘Lilac Mound’ in full sun for optimal foliage color and flowering performance. In summer, inconspicuous clusters of small yellow, pink, or white flowers appear at stem ends. Deadhead faded blooms to encourage a second flush. The creeping, ground-hugging habit of Sedum ‘Lilac Mound’ makes it an ideal choice for creating a dense, low-growing carpet in rock gardens, between pavers, or in containers. Trim stems to keep the mat compact.

12. Graptopetalum ‘Neon Breakers’Graptopetalum Neon Breakers Succulent Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Grass like leaves, Bright purple leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Graptopetalum ‘Neon Breakers’ features grassy leaves that emerge bright purple before fading to blue-green with age. New growth flushes purple all season. The slender, strap-like leaves of Graptopetalum ‘neon breakers’ form a dense rosette. Young leaves initially emerge a vivid violet-purple before gradually turning blue-green as they harden off.

However, throughout the growing season, new leaves unfurl bright purple, giving the plant a two-toned appearance. This easy-to-grow succulent requires only a little water and prospers in arid environments. Water only when the top one to two inches of soil are dry, allowing the entire root ball to dry out completely between waterings.

Place Graptopetalum ‘neon breakers’ in full sun for maximum color contrast between old and new growth. It can tolerate some shade but may lose some of the vibrant purple hue of young leaves under lower light conditions. Simply twist or peel off the pup with a portion of the parent stem still attached and place it on damp soil.

13. Sedum ‘Raspberry Ice’Sedum Raspberry Ice Indoor Succulent Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Grass like leaves, Speading
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Sedum ‘Raspberry Ice’ has trailing stems of fleshy reddish-purple leaves that emerge bright pink and then fade to burgundy. In summer, starry pink flowers appear. The trailing stems of Sedum ‘raspberry ice’ form mats or spill over the edges of containers. The thick succulent leaves are fleshy and oval-shaped, ranging in color from bright pink to reddish or burgundy purple.

New growth emerges bright pink before fading and darkening as leaves mature. This drought-tolerant succulent requires infrequent watering and thrives in hot, sunny locations. Allow the top one to two inches of soil to dry out between waterings and soak the soil thoroughly when watering. Avoid overwatering, which can cause leaves to turn yellow and drop off.

Place Sedum ‘raspberry ice’ in full sun for optimal coloration and flowering performance. In summer, clusters of starry pink flowers appear at the stem ends. The flowers complement the reddish-purple foliage. The cascading habit and color-changing leaves of Sedum ‘raspberry ice’ make it an attractive groundcover or spill-over succulent. Use it to trail from hanging baskets, cascade over rocks walls, or line path edges.

14. Senecio HerreianusCommon Pests in Senecio Herreianus Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Deep burgundy color, Spreading leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Aphids

Senecio herreianus begin their growth with deep burgundy leaves that mature to gray-green. New growth throughout the season emerges burgundy before graying. Young Senecio herreianus leaves emerge deep burgundy to almost black in color before gradually fading and turning gray-green as they age and harden.

However, new leaves continue to flush burgundy from growing points throughout the season. This gives the plant an attractive two-toned appearance with contrasting old and new foliage colors. This easy-to-grow succulent requires infrequent water and is perfect for hot, sunny, and dry locations. Water only when the top of the soil becomes completely dry.

Allow the entire root ball to dry out between waterings. Place Senecio herreianus in bright, indirect light for best color and plant health. While they can tolerate some direct sun, extreme light exposure can cause leaf discoloration and bleach out foliage colors.

15. Echeveria ‘E.C.’s Purple Rose’Succulent Echeveria ECS Purple Rose Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Rosette, Purple rose color
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Well drained soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Echeveria ‘E.C.’s Purple Rose’ forms compact rosettes of fleshy leaves with dark rose to burgundy colors. The leaves have toothed edges and a waxy coating for moisture retention. The fleshy leaves of Echeveria ‘E.C.’s purple rose’ are paddle-shaped and narrowly ovate with toothed edges. The leaves range in color from deep rose to almost black with burgundy undertones.

The foliage has a waxy coating that helps reduce moisture loss. This easy-to-grow succulent benefits from infrequent watering. Water only when the top one to two inches of soil are dry and allow the entire root mass to fully dry out between waterings. Infrequent deep watering that thoroughly saturates the soil is best.

Place Echeveria ‘E.C.’s purple rose’ in bright, indirect sunlight for optimal color and minimal leaf loss. While the Echeveria plant can tolerate some direct sun if gradually acclimated, extreme light can scorch the fleshy foliage. Partial shade to dappled light works best. In spring and summer, Echeveria ‘E.C.’s purple rose’ may produce bright pink tubular flowers on solitary stalks rising up to 12 inches above the foliage.

16. Othonna CapensisGrowing Othonna Capensis Plant America

🪴Key Points
  • Growing season: Spring, Summer
  • Leaf shape: Tufted leaves, Fuzzy purple leaves
  • Specific needs: Full sun, Sandy soil
  • Common pest: Mealybugs, Fungus gnats

Othonna capensis features tufts of fuzzy purple leaves that form ascending rosettes. New growth emerges burgundy each season. This drought-tolerant succulent prefers hot, sunny conditions and requires infrequent watering to maintain its lustrous purple color. The thick leaves of othonna capensis are covered in soft purple hairs that give the rosette a fuzzy texture.

The leaves are wedge-shaped and range in color from deep burgundy to almost black. New leaves push their way through the older foliage and also emerge burgundy when young.

Water Othonna capensis infrequently, allowing the top one to two inches of soil to dry out completely between waterings. This succulent thrives in hot, arid conditions with good drainage and minimal summer irrigation.

Place Othonna capensis in full sun for the deepest purple coloration and minimal leaf drop. It can tolerate some shade but may lose some of its attractive hue under lower light exposure. Hot, sunny conditions also help reduce excess moisture buildup.

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