10 Alocasia Varieties You Will Fall in Love With

Alocasia varieties of the Araceae family have become common houseplants due to their amazing beauty and tropical jungle vibes. They have large glossy leaves that will just about amp up any living space and make it much more beautiful.Alocasia Varieties You Will Fall in Love With ~ PlantAmerica

While most people know of only one or two alocasia varieties, nearly a hundred other cultivars come in different colors, shapes and sizes to suit your style perfectly. So, keep reading to learn more about our top alocasia varieties.

A List of 10 Different Alocasia Varieties That Will Amaze You

1. Alocasia Amazonica ‘Polly’

Alocasia amazonica Polly with heart shaped leaves ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Deep-green colored leaves with yellow-white, bright veins 
  • Large flapper-like leaves
  • Can reach heights of 11 to 20 inches
Care
  • Reasonably easy to look after 
  • Beginner-friendly plant 
  • Needs bright, indirect light 
When to Grow
  • Early summer 
  • Early spring 
Common Pests
  • Spider mites 
  • Aphids

Alocasia Polly is a lovely houseplant indigenous to South Asian tropical climates. These plants can produce tiny, light flowers in the correct circumstances, but they are more well-known for their glossy, heart-shaped leaves with ruffled edges and creamy white veining. All year long, A. Polly can be grown and maintained indoors. 

Because it is a smaller cultivar, maintenance is comparable to that of Amazonian elephant ears. Alocasia Polly should be kept out of the reach of children and animals due to its toxicity.

The Polly is a reasonably low-maintenance, quick-growing plant with the correct circumstances and basic care. Large amounts of filtered or dappled light, moist soil, high levels of humidity, and warm temperatures are all favorable for its growth.

Bright, indirect light, such as that from an east-facing window away from the sun, is ideal for this plant’s growth. Plant your Polly plants in potting soil that is rich and well-drained. To ensure that the soil around your Polly plant is continuously moist, water it often. However, this requires a fine balance because wet soil can cause root rot, while dry dirt may make the plant dormant.

2. Alocasia Amazonica BambinoAlocasia amazonica Bambino ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Large, spiky-looking leaves 
  • Deep green colors 
  • Thick striped leaves    
Care 
  • Needs a humid environment 
  • Needs bright light 
  • Should be handled with care as it can be toxic to the touch
When to Grow 
  • Early summer 
  • Early spring
Common Pests 
  • Mealy bugs 
  • Thrips

Alocasia amazonica Bambino is an eye-catching houseplant with long, arrowhead-shaped leaves with vivid veining. Southeast Asia is the original home of Alocasia bambino. When grown indoors, this plant, an Alocasia dwarf type (same as Alocasia gageana), will only grow to a height of around 12 inches. Alocasia grows successfully indoors with the right care.

This plant thrives in conditions similar to the warm, muggy tropical habitat it is native to. For this plant, keep the humidity levels above 70%. This baby will joyfully develop in a well-lit bathroom and enjoy the dampness from the shower. This plant is also known as the elephant ear plant or the African mask. A similar variety of this green variety is called the hooded dwarf.  

Despite their beauty, alocasias are not highly resilient to pests and diseases. Check the leaves of your Alocasia Bambino thoroughly for pests after you get them. Neem oil treatment on Alocasia leaves is a fantastic idea, and you should quarantine them from your other plants for a couple of weeks.

This plant does not tolerate dry spells between waterings and is not drought-tolerant. Try to maintain a consistent moisture level in the soil and water it according to a regular timetable. The soil must be free-draining and loose. Excess moisture will remain around the roots in compact soil combinations. This can have terrible consequences for the plant and cause root rot soon.

So saturate the soil and allow the water to drain through the drainage holes in the pot when watering these houseplants. For all plants, but especially for Alocasia houseplants, light is essential. These houseplants need six hours a day of bright indirect light to stay healthy. 

3. Alocasia ‘Black Velvet’

Alocasia Black Velvet Appearance  ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Distinct deep green-black leaves 
  • Yellow-white sparse veins 
Care 
  • Needs well-draining soil 
  • Needs a humid environment 
When to Grow
  • Early fall
  • Middle of winter 
Common Pests
  • Springtails
  • Thrips

Alocasia “Black Velvet (Alocasia reginula) is a well-liked miniature jewel alocasia with a compact growth habit and distinctive black foliage. Named for its regal aspect and dark, velvety leaves (but not as dark as those of Alocasia infernalis), the piercing white venation nicely contrasts.

Alocasia reginula ‘Black Velvet’ is a member of a select group of plant species that have (nearly) black leaves. It stands out wherever it is placed, which is actually in many places since it is a surprisingly adaptable plant.

Black velvet Alocasia plants are generally easy to maintain inside and in glass greenhouses, but there are a few crucial watering details that you need to be aware of to safeguard their roots and maintain their health. This plant seemingly pairs well with a green velvet Alocasia, pink dragon, Alocasia frydek, Alocasia infenalis, and Alocasia portei (Alocasia Malaysian monster).  

As a gem alocasia, you can anticipate modest growth from this species, which will remain very compact. Even when completely grown, Alocasia Black Velvet will only stand slightly over a foot tall.

Many gardeners discovered that this plant frequently allows its older leaves to fall off in favor of producing new ones, which can significantly slow down the entire growth process. Occasionally, they’ll bloom with a plain white blossom, although it’s not very attractive.

Before watering, let the top two inches of soil dry off. It’s prone to root rot, so avoid moist environments and overpotting. This Alocasia plant requires coarse, well-draining soil and cautious watering to prevent soggy circumstances. 

It enjoys temperatures between 59 and 80 degrees Fahrenheit, humidity between 60 and 75 percent, and moderate indirect light. During the growing season, fertilize sparingly every four weeks and occasionally repot. Superior to many other Aroids in its tolerance of reduced light, as it can grow in indirect, bright light.

4. Alocasia ‘ Melo’

Alocasia Melo with beautiful jade colored leaves ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Deep leafy green color
  • Large leaves 
  • Dark veins that blend in
Care 
  • Should not be overwatered
  • Requires two, three hours of sunlight 
When to Grow 
  • Early spring
  • Early summer 
Common Pests 
  • Spider mites 
  • Thrips 

The huge, beautiful jade-colored leaves of the Alocasia melo plant, also called Alocasia rugosa, are so thick that they nearly appear artificial. These leaves have exotic appeal due to their deep grooves. It’s surprisingly simple to cultivate and spread at home.

Not to sound dramatic, but A. Melo, also known as the Rugosa, is one of the plants that catch your eye immediately! These alocasia plants, a variant of jewel Alocasias (dwarf Alocasia plants with attractive leaves), are a recently discovered species from Borneo and it was formally identified in 1997.

Its obvious claim to fame is its unrealistically gorgeous leaves! Deep grooves in the bluish-green leaves press together to form a complex, almost mosaic-like design. Your plant gets its name from the cantaloupe melon that it resembles.

Your tropical A. Melo will thrive in a warm, enclosed environment with high humidity levels (above 70 percent is excellent) and moderate-to-strong indirect light.

The only catch is that they are particularly sensitive to overwatering, so you’ll need to adjust your watering habits and pick a potting mix with good drainage (we recommend a 15 percent indoor potting soil ratio to 85 percent soil lighteners like bark or perlite).

Consider your Alocasia Melo’s succulent-like leaves when watering it. Because of this adaptability, your plant can store water more effectively, requiring less water than other houseplants. Even while up to two to three hours of (gentler) direct light in the morning or evening are acceptable, avoid watering it in the afternoon when the sun is at its hottest. 

5. Alocasia Silver Dragon

Alocasia Silver Dragon with dramatic leaves ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Gray-hue green leaves 
  • Deeper colored veins 
Care
  • Needs higher levels of humidity 
  • Requires well-draining, rich soil
When to Grow
  • Mid spring
  • Early summer 
Common Pests 
  • Spider mites 
  • Springtails 

The silver Alocasia is a standout variety known for its beautifully dramatic leaves. Are you looking for a tropical houseplant that will spark conversation among your visitors? A. silver or Alocasia baginda is the only option. Their striking heart-shaped, dense foliage, like that of many Alocasia species, makes them stand out. 

The silver alocasia also stands out due to its highly textured dark green venation and light silver-green leaves. Additionally, it’s rather modest, which makes it perfect for creating a large impact in a small location. Because of their affinity for humidity, they will feel right at home in a bathroom. It pairs well with an Alocasia Ivory Coast, Alocasia regal, dragon scale Alocasia, Alocasia stingray, and Alocasia portodora. 

Be ready to work if you’re fortunate enough to acquire one of these uncommon and exotic-looking infants. These houseplants require a lot of care, so if you’re just starting with your indoor jungle, you might choose a less expensive, more widely accessible type.

The silver dragon is another example of why Alocasia plants aren’t necessarily the best for beginners. However, it will flourish if you can provide your finicky plant with the ideal amounts of light, warmth, and humidity. The secret is to as closely resemble the native tropical rainforest environment as you can.

These plants thrive in dappled light on the jungle floor of their natural habitats, the rainforests. To avoid root rot, use a well-draining soilless soil mix instead of plain soil. The potting soil around your Alocasia silver dragon shouldn’t be left to dry out completely.

6. Alocasia Cuprea

Alocasia Cuprea Growth Rate ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Brownish, green leaves
  • Deep color veins 
Care 
  • Avoid overwatering 
  • It should be handled with care as it can be toxic to the touch 
When to Grow 
  • Early spring 
  • Midsummer 
Common Pests 
  • Thrips 
  • Springtails 

You may find it difficult not to fall in love with a cuprea red secret plant. The cuprea is a gorgeous species that belongs to the Alocasia genus and is one of the harder-to-find indoor plants. If you ever do stumble across one, consider yourself lucky. Since this variety is unique, many people think caring for it may be difficult. However, this is not the case.

This plant has a combination of red, plum, and dark green colors on its leaves, making it a delight to look at. In addition, the metallic sheen just accentuates its appearance. The best pairing for the cuprea is with an Alocasia scalprum as the two complement each other well. 

Many pro gardeners will consider it a valuable find among houseplants because of how unique and rare of a plant it is. Alocasia cuprea is native to the jungles of Borneo. One thing to note is that although it is an extremely beautiful plant, it does tend to be one of the more toxic varieties. Hence, you will need to take extra care when working with it.

The good thing is that you can grow Alocasia cuprea easily. It does not require “fussy” care and will be one of the more low-maintenance kinds. Basic care will help your cuprea plants thrive. And if you’ve ever had an Alocasia, caring for the cuprea is similar. 

If you want A. cuprea to live a long time, you must water it carefully. A. cuprea plants can thrive with just an average amount of water. Depending on the season, you can water cuprea two to three times per week. It is typical for this plant to receive indirect light because it is from the rainforest, where tree canopies are common. 

7. Alocasia Reversa

Alocasia reversa care requirements ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Silver hue on green leaves 
  • The veins are a deeper color than the rest of the leaf
Care 
  • Water when soil is dry 
  • Use well-draining soil 
When to Grow 
  • Mid spring
  • Early summer 
Common Pests 
  • Thrips 
  • Springtails 

While most alocasia varieties will have lighter leaf veins, A. reversa plants have much deeper green veins when compared to the rest of the leaf. If you don’t have room for a tall-growing Alocasia yet want a striking tropical plant in your house, this is the plant for you. A. reversa plant grows to a height of roughly 16 inches, and its leaves expand to a length of eight inches. 

The care requirements for this plant are the same as for other Alocasia types (such as the popular kris plant, Alocasia regal shield and Alocasia reginae), even though its leaf color pattern is inverted. 

One of the primary things you need to learn is how to prevent making the soil too wet for this plant to live, as overwatering is a big no-no for tropical plants like the Alocasia. Watering shouldn’t be done before the top two inches of soil have dried up. 

Providing tropical plants with the proper amount of light can be challenging. The Reversa will require bright, indirect light. It’s also crucial to pick a soil type that supports drainage and aeration to keep extra moisture away from the roots.

8. Alocasia Zebrina

Alocasia zebrina nature s miracles ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Bright green colored leaves 
  • Tall and long stems
  • Heart-shaped leaves 
Care
  • Water weekly
  • Use natural fertilizer 
When to Grow 
  • Spring
  • Summer
Common Pests 
  • Thrips
  • Spider mites 

Regarding plants, Alocasia zebrina is one of nature’s miracles. However, the plant requires a lot of growth and care. To thrive and be their best, these gorgeous indoor plants need a lot of care, ideal surroundings, and a consistent maintenance schedule.

There must be enough bright yet indirect light for this Alocasia to flourish. Their large leaves were made to capture as much light as possible from the canopy of the shadowed jungle. Keep in mind that prolonged exposure to direct sunlight might scorch the leaves of the elephant ear

Water your Zebrina plant frequently because it prefers damp soil. Be cautious when watering, as the roots might rot from too much moisture. Make sure the soil used to grow your A. Zebrina is well-draining, nutrient-rich, and able to retain moisture for a considerable time.

9. Alocasia Dragon Scale

Alocasia Dragon Scale grown as a houseplant inside ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Dragon-scale-like leaves
  • Deep in color 
  • Thick leaves 
Care
  • Don’t let the soil dry out
  • Water regularly 
When to Grow 
  • Mid spring
  • Early summer 
Common pests 
  • Spider mites 
  • Springtails 

Araceae family member Alocasia’ Dragon Scale‘ is a delicate, rhizomatous, evergreen perennial cultivar. This delicate plant produces a beautiful foliage show. It’s one of the most beautiful alocasias, alongside the tiger taro and night-scented lily.

It is usually grown as a houseplant inside, where it thrives when given enough humidity. Many enjoy placing this beautiful plant in bathrooms, kitchens, or other window sills where ample indirect, bright light is available.

Make sure the soil has good drainage to prevent waterlogging of the roots. The magnificent leaves of this plant are enormous, oblong, and have sharp points. The cultivar’s name comes from its stunning dark metallic green color and highly veined look, which resembles dragon scales. 

Regular watering is necessary for dragon Alocasias, and the soil shouldn’t be allowed to become dry. As for the soil, a coarse, well-draining soil mix is the best choice.

10. Alocasia Longiloba

stand out characteristics of Alocasia longiloba ~ PlantAmerica

Appearance 
  • Elongated heart-shaped leaves
  • Deep in color 
Care
  • Requires bright light
  • Avoid overwatering 
When to Grow 
  • Early spring 
  • Midsummer 
Common Pests 
  • Spider mites 
  • Springtails 

Large, arrow-shaped, bluish-green leaves with silver veining and borders and light-green or purple undersides, are stand-out characteristics of Alocasia longiloba. Mottled brown leaf stalks support these leaves. It is quite similar to Alocasia sarian in appearance. Due to its gorgeous leaves, the plant is a spectacular addition to any indoor plant collection and reasonably easy to grow.

It is a highly prized variety, just like other species such as Alocasia gageana and Alocasia portora. In the Philippines, the plant was first described by Fredrich Anton Wilheim Miquel in the 1800s. The elongated lobes of the mature leaves were referred to as “longilobus” in Latin.

For A. longiloba to flourish inside, the proper growing conditions must be provided. In addition to routine feeding and pruning, it needs warm, humid weather, moderately wet, fertile, well-drained soils, and brilliant indirect light away from direct sunshine.

Just like its brothers and sisters, you will want to keep A. Longiloba moist but not soaking wet. Make sure to check their soil once a week. A rich and well-draining one should do just fine. As for lighting, bright indirect sunlight is always ideal. 

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