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What you need:
  • Gloves
  • Pruners
Pruning a rose may seem complicated, but breaking it down into a few basic steps makes the job easier. You'll need pruners and heavy gloves. This method applies to hybrid teas, floribundas, grandifloras, and many of the more hybrid tea-like English roses. Shrub, antique and climbing roses are treated differently.
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In cold climates (zone 6 and below), roses should be pruned in the fall before winterizing them. In warmer climates, spring is the best time, from late February to early March. First remove all dead, damaged or diseased growth, and any spindly, unproductive canes or shoots.
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Make each pruning cut either back to a side branch or to an outward-facing bud. The correct way is to make your cut 1/4" above the bud, at a slight angle facing away from it.
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Next, target canes that are growing toward the center of the bush, or crossing and rubbing others. If these are good strong canes, you need not remove them altogether. Just cut them back to a branch or bud that faces away from the center of the bush.
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Now you should have a nice, open-centered shape with strong canes pointing up and out. All that remains is to cut these canes back. How far you cut them depends on the type of rose and how vigorously it is growing.
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The final step is to prune back the remaining primary canes. For hybrid teas such as this rose, prune each cane back hard, removing as much as 2/3 of its overall height. Floribundas, English roses, and grandifloras are pruned less severely, to about their original height. Cut just above an outward facing bud.