Close Window
Click picture to enlarge
What you need:
  • Spade
  • Tarp
  • Hose
  • Old kitchen knife

Daylilies are rugged perennials. Though they can be divided at practically any time of year, early spring, late summer, and early fall are ideal. Use a strong spade to lift the clump, digging about 6-8" out from the base of the plant. When dividing a daylily in fall, begin by cutting off the foliage about 6" above the ground to get a clear view of the base of the plant.
Click picture to enlarge
Lift the daylily from the hole and shake off any excess soil. Pick up the clump and drop it repeatedly to dislodge additional soil from the root ball.
Click picture to enlarge
To divide a daylily clump, place the blade of your spade between two large fans and slice through the crown of the plant, cutting it in half. The fleshy roots are usually easy to cut, but don't hesitate to jump on the spade if necessary.
Click picture to enlarge
Once you have divided the daylily into two clumps, you may want to wash off any remaining soil to make it easier to see where to make further divisions.
Click picture to enlarge
Daylily crowns are composed of shoots or "fans." When you divide the crown, you cut between fans or pull them apart. You can reduce a clump to its component fans; as long as a fan has roots, it can survive on its own. A single-fan plant requires several years to flower well, while a division with 3 or 4 fans quickly makes a nice garden plant. If you can't pull divisions away, use an old, stiff-bladed kitchen knife to cut through the crown, slicing triangular, pie-shaped pieces.
Click picture to enlarge
After dividing, replant each piece. Set the divisions in the ground so the line where the fans turn from white to green is level with the soil surface.